Thursday, October 1, 2015

1 October 2015 A.D. Jewel’s “Apology”—Roman misdeeds: poisoning of Henry the Emperor, Victor the Pope, King John of England and other misdeeds…were these Lutherans or Zuinglians?


1 October 2015 A.D. Jewel’s “Apology”—Roman misdeeds: poisoning of Henry the Emperor, Victor the Pope, King John of England and other misdeeds…were these Lutherans or Zuinglians? p.83-84
Jewel, John. “The Apology of the Church of England.” Project Gutenberg. 5 Aug 2006. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17678/17678-h/17678-h.htm. Accessed 1 Aug 2015.
We are cloyed with examples in this behalf, and it should be very tedious to reckon up all the notorious deeds of the bishops of Rome.  Of which side were they, I beseech you, which poisoned Henry the Emperor even in the receiving of the sacrament? which poisoned Victor the Pope even in the receiving of the chalice? which poisoned our King John, king of England, in a drinking cup?  Whosoever at least they were and of what sect soever, I am sure they were neither Lutherans nor Zuinglians.  What is he at this day, which alloweth the mightiest kings and monarchs of the world to kiss his blessed feet?  What is he that commandeth the emperor to go by him at his horse bridle, and the French king to hold his stirrup?  Who hurled under his table Francis Dandalus the duke of Venice, king of Crete and Cyprus, fast bound with chains, to feed of bones among his dogs?  Who set the imperial crown upon the Emperor Henry the Sixth’s head, not with his hand, but with his foot; and with the same foot again cast the same crown off, saying withal, “he had power to make emperors, and to unmake them again at his pleasure”?  Who put in arms Henry the son against the emperor his father Henry the Fourth, and wrought so that the father was taken prisoner of his own son, and being shorn and shamefully handled, was thrust into a monastery, where with hunger and sorrow he pined away to death?  Who so ill-favouredly and monstrously put the Emperor Frederick’s neck under his feet, and, as though that were not sufficient, added further this text out of the Psalms, “Thou shalt go upon the adder and cockatrice, and shalt tread the lion and dragon under thy feet”?  Such an example of scorning and contemning a prince’s majesty, as never before that was heard tell of in any remembrance; except, I ween, either of Tamerlane’s, the king of Scythia, a wild and barbarous creature, or else of Sapor king of the Persians.

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